Can you be allergic to cats but not dogs?

Can you be allergic to cats and not dogsThe answer is yes. Yes, it is possible to be allergic to cats and not dogs. You can be allergic to dogs and not cats. However, the proteins are similar. If you are allergic to one furred mammal, you are likely allergic to most of the others.

According to the American Pet Products Association, there are about 78 million dogs and 85.8 million cats living in homes in the US. That means almost 44% of all households have a dog and 35% have a cat.

If the presence of your precious pet is causing you pain, you’re not alone. Up to 15% of the general population and 30% of the allergic population have reactions to cats and dogs.

If you have pet allergies, chances are it is the cat rather than the dog that’s making you sneeze. While an estimated 10 percent of people are allergic to household pets, cat allergies are twice as common as dog allergies, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

With that being said you can live with pets. Here are some resources to help you with your allergies and help your pets stay with their family.

Article – What is pet dander and how do you get rid of it? 

Article – Can you be allergic to cats and not dogs?

Article – What are the best breeds of cats for people with allergies?

Wishing you the best of health

Mike

PS. Don’t put all the blame on cats and dogs,  they aren’t the only creatures that can trigger your allergies. People also sneeze around cows, rodents, horses, and birds.

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7 Dust Mite Myths Busted

WOW have the phones been ringing like crazy this week! Seems like everyone has a question or two about dust mites.  We noticed that there are lots of misconceptions about things that dust mites do. We want to set the record straight.

7 Dust Mite Myths Busted
7 Dust Mite Myths Busted – Click to enlarge

Dust mites are biting me! – No, dust mites aren’t biting you. They can’t bite you. They don’t have a mouth with teeth.  Instead, they have an opening that scoops up shed bits of  skin. Instead of chewing their food the way we do, they secrete an enzyme that breaks the food down and begins digestion. Dust mites don’t have a  mouth, they don’t have teeth, they don’t chew, and they don’t bite !

If your skin itches, it is more likely  an allergic reaction to the proteins that are found in the waste products of the dust mites.

I feel the dust mites crawling on me! – A dust mite is too small to see with the naked eye. You certainly can’t feel them walking around on your skin. They may hitch a ride on your clothing, but dust mites don’t live on people. If you even want to see a dust mite, you will need at least a 10X magnification microscope.

Dust mites are escaping from my vacuum! – No they are not. Dust mites aren’t mobile enough to crawl out of your vacuum cleaner. Dust mites (dead or alive) and their fragmented body parts, shed skins and feces only escape  your vacuum cleaner if it leaks through the exhaust.

Always vacuum with a HEPA-filtered vacuum to reduce dust mite allergens in homes.

Dust mites are flying around my house!–  Dust mites don’t have wings. They can’t fly.

I feel them under my skin!  – Those aren’t dust mites. Scabies  burrow into the skin, not dust mites.

They are chewing through my mattress cover! – Dust mites don’t chew. If something is biting you it could be bed bugs.  Dust mite covers trap allergens and prevent them from becoming airborne. A high quality dust mite proof cover on your mattress and pillows will protect you.

Got Questions?

Still have questions about allergies or dust mites? Give us a call at (800) 771-2246 or drop us a line allergy@allergystore.com.

 

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Use Caution When Treating Seasonal Allergies

Allergy season is here, and over-the-counter allergy medications are flying off tpills for allergieshe shelves. But did you know that mixing certain allergy medications with other medicines can have hazardous effects on your health?

The active ingredients of allergy products can cause over-medicating with other combination or single-entity non-prescription or prescription medications.

“By consulting with your pharmacist, consumers can make an educated choice as to which allergy medicine is right for them,” says Dr. Daniel A. Hussar, Remington professor of pharmacy at Philadelphia College of Pharmacy at University of the Sciences in Philadelphia. “Consumers should read the warnings on over-the-counter medicines and consult with their pharmacist or doctor in order to make educated decisions about which allergy medication is right for them.”

“Certain allergy medications (antihistamines) can cause drowsiness or sleepiness, and caution must be observed when participating in activities like driving or operating machinery,” Hussar noted. If this response is bothersome, the consumer should ask the pharmacist to recommend a product that does not cause this sedative effect.

Some antihistamines have a drying effect and cause annoying effects like dry mouth. “This is another situation in which the pharmacist can recommend another product that is not likely to cause this effect.”

Some allergy products contain analgesics such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen. When an allergy product containing one of these analgesics as a secondary ingredient is taken by a patient who is also using an analgesic for another purpose, an excessive response may result. Side effects may be subtle and develop slowly but, in some individuals serious stomach, kidney, or liver problems could result.

Some patients with high blood pressure may experience problems due to the decongestants included in many allergy products. Decongestants can raise blood pressure, which can be particularly dangerous in patients with high blood pressure that is not well controlled, says Hussar.

Dr. Hussar has been quoted and has published extensively on issues surrounding consumer-related pharmacy practices.

Wishing you the best of health

The Allergy Store

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