12 Tips to Reduce Dust Mites in Your Bedroom

Do you wake up in the morning and feel like you never went to sleep? Got a stopped up nose and puffy eyes?  That’s what you get for sleeping with dust mites.

Sleeping With Dust Mites is a Bad Idea

Reduce Dust Mites
Dust Mite

Whether they are dead or alive, sleeping with dust mites is a bad idea. The dead ones can make you just as sick as the living ones.  It’s the feces and body parts from the dust mites that are the allergens. Just killing the mites won’t remove the allergen although reducing populations is always a good thing. Reduce your dust mite populations and associated allergens by making some changes to your bedroom and your cleaning routine. Even if you can’t do everything,  just do a few of these things to reduce the number of dust mites in the bedroom.

Tips to Reduce Dust Mites

  1. Wash all bed linens once a week in hot water that is 140°F or hotter. Unfortunately most of the hot water in your  home is 105°F to 107°F. Good news is that there are very effective products that make up for your lack of temperature.
  2. Cover your mattress, pillows and box springs with zippered allergy proof covers. Higher quality ones will last you for years so don’t waste money on cheap ones. The cheap ones won’t last but a year or two.
  3. Hang your comforters, bedspreads and blankets outside in the sunlight (especially if you have wool or silk). The sun will kill the mites. The downside to this tip is that bedding may pick up pollen, not good if you have seasonal allergies.
  4. Toss comforters, bedspreads and blankets in the dryer for 15 minutes on the fluff setting every 2 to 3 weeks. It will knock out some dust without fading your colors.
  5. Freeze stuffed toys overnight and toss them in the dryer in the morning.  Freezing kills the mites and tumbling in the dryer loosens the allergens.
  6. Keep the humidity below 40%.
  7. Steam clean chairs, sofas, couches and carpets.
  8. Steam clean carpets and rugs on a regular basis. Make sure that the company or equipment you use has a good extraction system. Trading mold for dust mites is a bad thing.
  9. Get rid of carpeting if you can and eliminate the need for steam cleaning.
  10. Replace your pillows every six to eight months unless they are protected with a zippered dust mite proof pillow cover.
  11. Clean early in the day.  All the dust you stir up will have a change to settle before bedtime. Don’t forget to clean the ceiling fan.
  12. Last but not least – get rid of the excess clutter and dust catchers in the bedroom. Do you really need 12 pillows on the bed? We have not had curtains in our bedroom for 20 years. I still remember the day we took them down. What a dust cloud that caused!

Wishing you the best of health.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusrss

What Does Pore Size Mean in Allergy Proof Bedding

If you are diagnosed with dust mite allergies, the doctor will tell you to encase your bed in dust mite proof covers. That’s great advice. But, it isn’t all the information you need to make an informed buying decision. I know. That’s because we field lots of calls from people that want to know about pore sizes, microweaves, and laminated or coated allergy proof bedding. They are confused and looking for answers. We’re here to help.

get your allergy zippered mattress covers protect against sick bed syndromeThe Role of Allergy Proof Bedding in Keeping Allergens at Bay

The doctor tells you to use allergy proof bedding because it protects you from allergens that are too small to be seen. Dust mites, dust mite feces, bits of pollen and animal allergens collect in and on fiber surfaces. Your mattress, pillows, duvet or comforter are all places for allergens to collect.

Allergy proof bedding puts a barrier between you and the allergens. If you can’t breathe the allergen, it won’t make you sick.

As long as you wash your sheets every 7 days in 140ºF water, allergens won’t build up on top of your allergy covers.  The special zippered covers and the hot water washing keep the allergens at bay.

allergy proof bedding is 25% offWhat Makes Bedding Allergy Proof?

So, now we understand why we need allergy-proof bedding, but what is it that makes bedding allergy proof?

There are two ways to approach making a fabric allergy-proof: laminate it or weave it tightly.

Laminated fabrics are just a traditional bed linen fabric that has been bonded to a material that makes the fabric impenetrable to allergens. These fabrics can be cotton, synthetic, or a blend of the two.  It’s not the fabric that is allergy-proof, it’s the laminated backing. The laminate is some form of plastic. Heats bonds the plastic to the fabric.  Laminated fabrics don’t depend on the fabric to provide protection; they rely on the laminate. Laminates don’t have a pore size.

Microweave fabrics provide a barrier that allergens can’t get through. That’s because they have a very tight weave. The space between the fibers used to weave the fabric is the pore size. The larger the pore size, the more allergens that can get through. The smaller the pore size, the more particles the fabric can stop.

dust mites cause dust allergy
Small Pore Sizes Keep Dust Mites Out

Effective Pore Sizes

The pore size is determined by how tightly the fabric is woven.  Natural fibers like cotton are not very strong. You can’t weave cotton tightly. Polyester is a very strong fiber. It’s perfect for tight microweaves.

Allergy proof bedding with the smallest pore size will be all polyester. All cotton allergy proof bedding will have a larger pore size. Cotton/polyester blends are in the middle when it comes to pore sizes.

Dust mite fecal matter and/or body parts (we don’t actually breathe in whole dust mites) are as large as 10 microns. Pet allergen and mold spores are about 3 microns. In order for a microweave mattress encasing to be effective against dust mites it needs a pore size of 10 microns or less and 3 microns or less to be effective against mold and dander.

With that being said, all laminated mattress encasings are effective against dust mite, animal dander and mold allergens because they are a total barrier. They are water-proof too.

Differences in Allergy Proof Bedding

Microweaves and laminates are both effective in protecting against allergens. Which one you choose boils down to personal preference and budget.

Laminates are waterproof, microweaves are not.

Microweaves are generally cooler than laminated fabrics.

Laminated fabrics usually cost less.

Both fabrics require special care when washing. You can’t use high temperatures or chlorine bleach on laminates. Microweaves need gentle agitation to protect the weave.

Hope this clears up the pore size question. Have other questions about bedding? Just enter your question in the comments below.

Wishing you the best of health
Mike Krause

AllergyStore.com

©Copyright 1996-2018  AllergyStore.com™ All Rights Reserved

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusrss

Are You an Informed Consumer of Allergy Control Products?

About 50 million people in the US suffer from allergies. That’s a huge market for allergy related products. Unfortunately, at the intersection of the growing number of people with allergies and consumer awareness of allergies are many many enterprising and not so reputable companies trying to make a buck. There is nothing immoral or wrong about making a profit. But it is wrong to promise people to relieve suffering and provide allergy relief if you can’t deliver. The Allergy Store believes consumers of allergy control products should be armed with information to make informed decisions. Let’s take a look at some commonly used terms for marketing allergy control products.

It’s Hypoallergenic! 

All the term hypoallergenic means is that the materials used to construct the product were not shown to cause an allergic reaction in the test subjects.  So think about that for a moment. Peanut butter is 100% hypoallergenic to people that don’t have a peanut allergy.  Got it? So that means that a pillow marked as hypoallergenic just means the material in the pillow itself did not cause allergic reactions. That does not mean that when you bring the pillow home it will not collect mold spores or dust mites. In the case of wool products, you must be particularly careful. Wool naturally repels dust mites, so many times it is called hypoallergenic. But wool contains lanolin. This natural substance keeps dust mites at bay, but it causes allergic reactions in many people.

Bottom line: Hypoallergenic is a useless term for evaluating allergy control products

drink water to prevent dry skin Its All Natural!

These days we assume that something that is minimally processed is better. Natural comes from nature, so it must be better than anything man-made. Sounds so sensible it must be true.

Except all natural does not always mean all good.  Arsenic, poison ivy, and the influenza virus are all natural.  However, I wouldn’t recommend any of them to my friends or family.

The current raw water trend is another great example. Raw water must be great for you because it is all natural and it hasn’t been treated. Except it isn’t. There’s a reason we treat water; and it’s to kill harmful microorganisms.

Bottom line:  Evaluate these claims carefully.  Don’t sacrifice safety at the altar of all natural.

Allergy Control Products like HEPA filters reduce airborne allergens Its HEPA!

HEPA is a measurement. Think of a ruler from your school days. It measured inches, usually 12 of them at a time.HEPA is a measurement of filtering capability. It means that 99.95% of particles 3 microns or larger are captured by the filter. “Medical HEPA” doesn’t exist. Whether you are in a medical setting or an industrial manufacturing setting or a bedroom, HEPA is HEPA. Putting the filtering measurement in a medical setting doesn’t change the measurement. There are 12 inches in every foot whether you are inside or outside an operating room, HEPA is the same.

“HEPA like” doesn’t mean anything. Either the filtering capability meets HEPA requirements or it doesn’t. Swimming “fish-like” doesn’t make a tadpole a fish. It’s still a baby frog. HEPA-like doesn’t make something HEPA and you can’t be “like” HEPA. Either it is or it isn’t.

When evaluating any product with HEPA filtration capabilities, you need to also evaluate how and if the unit is sealed. This is particularly important with vacuum cleaners. Many models leak particles before they get to the filter. Ask about how the unit prevents leaks.

Bottom line: Only HEPA is HEPA. Don’t settle for anything less.

Allergy Control Products That Really Work

Don’t fall for marketing hype. Stick with tried and true allergy control products that really work.

Dust mite proof bedding works. It is proven every time it is tested.

Allergen Wash was proven to work in independent studies.   See the results on the manufacturer’s website.

Denaturing agents like tannic acid have been independently tested and proven effective.  Allerpet denatures allergens and the application process removes allergens as well. That’s a two-fer.

HEPA air filters remove airborne allergens. Just make sure you get the right size filter for the room.

When in doubt, ask.

Got a question about an allergy control product you’ve seen advertised elsewhere? Drop us a line or give us a call at 1-800-771-2246. We’ll help you evaluate the claims. Be informed. We think that makes YOU the best consumer.

 

©Copyright 1996-2018 AllergyStore.com™ All Rights Reserved

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusrss